Full record for splatterpunk n.

Definition a subgenre of horror fiction characterized by the frequent and graphic description of grisly violence, bloody deaths, and extreme sexual situations; (in later use also) a similar genre of cinema, computer games, etc.
OED requirements antedating 1987
Earliest cite D.W. Taylor in Horrorstruck
Comment The OED's entry notes that the term was probably coined by David J. Schow at the 1986 World Fantasy Convention.

Lawrence Person submitted a 1988 cite from an article by Lawrence Person in Nova Express. This article itself cites three other critical articles on Splatterpunk, but not in sufficient detail to fully identify the relevant sources. The article references the October 1988 issue of Twilight Zone magazine, the premier issue of Midnight Graffiti, and an unspecified issue of Penthouse. Jeff Prucher located and submitted the cite from Twilight Zone, which was from Philip Nutman's "Inside the New Horror". Lawrence Person identified the Penthouse issue as Sept. 1988.

Jeff Prucher submitted a 1987 cite from an article by D.W. Taylor in "Horrorstruck".

Added to the OED in March 2002. Earliest cite in the OED: 1988.

Last modified 6 July, 2008

Citations for splatterpunk n.

click here for more information about the citation list

1987 D. W. Taylor in Horrorstruck Sept.–Oct. 5/1 Student reaction was as varied as our story types. Some reveled in rock horror and splatter-punk, finding the quiet literary horror tale boring.
1987 D. B. Silva in Horrorstruck Sept.–Oct. 5/1 The splatter punks are doing some excellent stuff. Ray Garton's Live Girls is one of the best horror novels I've read in a long time.
1987 F. P. Wilson in Horrorstruck Sept.–Oct. 5/1 The splatter punks are doing some excellent stuff. Ray Garton's Live Girls is one of the best horror novels I've read in a long time.
1987 D. W. Taylor in Horrorstruck Sept.–Oct. 5/1 Student reaction was as varied as our story types. Some reveled in rock horror and splatter-punk, finding the quiet literary horror tale boring.
1988 Rod Serling's Twilight Zone Mag. Oct. 29/1 As a style, Splatterpunk is often gross, usually extreme, and always visceral.
1988 Nova Express Summer 18/2 The second attribute found in a typical splatterpunk story is the use of grotesque and extremely imaginative images, images that are both fascinating and repulsive at the same time.
1988 Nova Express Summer 18/2 But most of all, the new style gave the nascent splatterpunks an unprecedented freedom to do whatever they wanted to. In short, a new generation of horror writers found (like the tag line for Barker's ‘Hellraiser’) that ‘there are no limits’.
1988 Nova Express Summer 18/1 The second splatterpunk progenitor was the novel Vampire Junction , written by science fiction writer Somtow Sucharitkul under the pseudonym S. P. Somtow.
1988 Nova Express Summer 17/2 When the word ‘splatterpunk’ first came into use (a half comical, half serious reply to the hip arrogance and shrewd calculation that rocketed the word ‘cyberpunk’ to genre wide prominence), there were two works that were regarded as the first true examples of ‘splatterpunk’ horror. The first was Clive Barker's Books of Blood.
1988 Nova Express Summer 17/1 They're young. They're gifted. And they're ready to rock and roll. Ladies and gentlemen, I give you The Splatterpunks.
1988 Rod Serling's Twilight Zone Mag. Oct. 25/1 The New Horror's most visible practicioners [sic] are a rude, unruly lot. Hip to the tendency of culture to instantly stencil labels on nascent movements, they've styled themselves ‘Splatterpunks’, in a deliberate, preemptive strike.
1990 Thrust Winter 21/2 There were only three deaths, and nothing there you wouldn't see on prime-time TV. The treatment‥was the work of our very own John Skip and Craig Spector, the original Splatterpunks, who actually didn't splatter very much.
1991 Sci. Fiction Chron. May 10/3 ‘The Splatterpunk Trend, and Welcome to It’‥touched on all aspects of the genre.
1992 Locus June 26/3 What she does do is devote chapters to‥satanism‥, Robert Bloch, splatterpunk, and Stephen King.
1993 SFRA Rev. Jan. 97 Frightening with the same flair as Block/Hitchcock's Psycho , and without the disgusting splatterpunk horror twists so common.
1993 SFRA Rev. May 88 It is after all a straightforward horror action tale in the splatterpunk tradition.
1994 Interzone Jan. 62/3 What it most definitely is not is of the splatterpunk school of blood'n'guts'n'sex'n'drugs'n'rock'n'roll which in the late 80s clawed its way to the centre of attention in the horror genre.
1995 SFRA Rev. May 33 Barker's extravagant, thematically unconventional, and often very gross stories earned critical kudos, became wildly popular, and got Barker mis-labelled as a ‘splatterpunk’ horror writer.
1997 Interzone May 59/2 The grand old days of all-encompassing sf have now given way to an even greater degree of specialization than could have been dreamed of when the New Worlds crew were deemed to be new wave : now we have cyberpunk, splatterpunk, hard sf, space opera, space fantasy‥and so on.
2001 Locus June 70/3 Even with more than a reasonable quota of graphic violence and kinky sex, it can't be dismissed as simply a chunk of splatterpunk arrived late on the scene.